Reusing images from copyrighted journal articles Part 4: Wiley

Part 1: ACS Journals – Part 2: Elsevier Journals – Part 3: RSC Journals

So after a short break, for the 4th post in this series I’m going to quickly look at the situation with reusing images from Wiley Journals. Firstly, a current mini review in Angewandte of which I’m not an author, and secondly, an old paper of mine in Chemistry, a European Journal. Wiley uses the same copyright clearance system (RightsLink) as in the first 3 posts so we’re on familiar ground here.

Firstly the reuse of a single figure by an academic user in a presentation or poster  appears to be free, however when you click on the Continue button, you need to provide your presentation title, date, Sponsor? and of course you have to log in to RightsLink. For use on a website the “Quick Price” is not available. Clicking continue takes you to additional forms including the website you intend to publish to. Ultimately you end up at a “submit order” page which contains all of your personal account details (so I’m not going to show a screen grab) and a statement that your request will be processed within 5 working days. I’m guessing that in this sense “Sponsor” means a conference sponsor, which could constitute quite a list and may not be fully available while you’re preparing your poster.

Use of one figure from an Angewandte article as an academic user is free, but requires a license

Use of one figure from an Angewandte article as an academic user is free, but requires a license

For the second example, that of a 2003 paper of mine, the process is broadly similar. I as the author of the work can use up to half of the material in the paper in subsequent presentations or posters and “other works”, except in a new journal article, which seems obvious enough. For use on the web, the form redirects you back to the initial copyright transfer form which is different now from 2003 but broadly gives you the right to use the images for non-commercial purposes.

As expected, as an author of the work you have more rights than as a non-author. You may use up to half the material for non-commercial purposes

As expected, as an author of the work you have more rights than as a non-author. You may use up to half the material for non-commercial purposes

So all in all it would seem that Wiley is pretty reasonable in what it will let you do with published images if you’re a not-for-profit academic or other educational user. And finally it would be remiss of me not to mention that reuse of images (or other content) from Wiley’s open access ChemistryOPEN, is done under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License CC BY-NC-ND, which is as it should be.

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About martin

almost on holidays
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